I-MAG Magazine

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Aroma Therapy (Part 2)

E-mail Print PDF
User Rating: / 0
PoorBest 

Welcome again to the world of aromatherapy. Hope you enjoy using this type of therapy as it easy to do at home. In the last issue we presented to you some plants that could be used in aromatherapy, and we will continue in this issue with some plants used also in aromatherapy which can be easy found around you in the garden or even in your kitchen.

Rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinal)
The name rosemary means rose of sea, a reference to the original habitat of the plant on the dry, sandy countries of the Mediterranean Sea.

Even today the best pungent oil comes from Spain or North Africa; the dryer and hotter the climate, the better the aroma. Rosemary is a very famous herb in Lebanon and widely use in Lebanese food. Rosemary oil smells quite similar to eucalyptus.

Safety issue: Rosemary is not advised for people with high pressure, as it is a stimulating oil. It should be avoided by people who suffer from epilepsy.

Main use: Eases muscular ache and pains, backache, poor circulation, stimulates scalp and eases dandruff, clears breath in cold and flu. It also stimulates the mind and wakes up the brain.

Suggested blends:

  1. For aches and pains and poor circulation try to use four drops of rosemary, two drops of lemongrass and four drops of nutmeg in 20 ml of carrier oil.
  2. For a hair and scalp tonic try to add five drops of rosemary and five drops of tea tree to 20 ml of unfragransed shampoo. Use this shampoo on your hair then wash your hair as normal.
  3. To ease breath in colds and flu, add three drops of rosemary and three drops of tea tree to a bowl of nearly boiling water and inhale the vapour for 20 minutes.
  4. To stimulate the brain vaporise three drops of rosemary and three drops of peppermint.

Nutmeg (Myristica Fagras)
The nutmeg tree grows in Indonesia and Sri Lanka. The fruits are covered with a layer called mace which is removed before processing. The high aromatic nutmegs are steam distilled to give a fragrant essential oil. In Western herbal tradition nutmeg was prized for their digestive tonic and muscle warming properties.

Safety issue: A strong oil, so should be used in moderation.

Fragrance profile: Warm sharp spicy and sweet.

Main use: Eases muscle ache and pain, soothes and calms indigestion, relieves stomach cramps. Also helps to re-energise the body after illness, uplifting the spirit and restoring the circulation.

Suggested blends:

  1. For aches and pains add two drops of nutmeg, four drops of cardamom and four drops of grapefruit to 20 ml of carrier oil and massage into affected area.
  2. To ease digestion add two drops of nutmeg, four drops of peppermint and four drops of ginger to 20 ml of carrier oil and make an abdominal massage.
  3. As a restore tonic add one drop of nutmeg, two drops of black pepper and two drops of orange to a warm bath and relax in the water.

Cardamom (Elettaria Cardamomum)
Cardamom produces aromatic flowers that turns into little seed pods filled with tiny black seeds. The pods are traditionally eaten in India after eating spicy food. Cardamom is commonly used in Eastern medicine as a lung tonic and immunity-boosting plant remedy.

Safety issue: No issue.

Main use: Soothing and opening chest, helps in soothing stomach cramps and indigestion. Uplifts the mind and gives positive feelings.

Suggest blends:

  1. To improve breath add three drops of cardamom and two drops of cedarwood to a bowl of nearly boiling water and inhale the vapour. Repeat twice daily.
  2. To help ease digestion massage the abdomen twice daily with three drops of cardamom, three drops of coriander and four drops of orange in 20 ml of carrier oil.

 

Radwa Samir -

Radwa Samir has a bachelor's degree in pharmacy from Cairo University.

Read More >>

Articles by this Author:

Heredity, D.N.A. and Genome: Top Secrets of Life (1.Heredity)
Did you ask your self about the similarities between you...
Read More >>
The Common Cold: Win The Battle Aganist Your Pouring Guest
The common cold is a pouring guest on our health....
Read More >>
Last Updated on Monday, 25 December 2006 22:43  

Read I-MAG

The image “http://www.i-mag.org/images/stories/pdf_icon.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Download PDFs

The image “http://www.i-mag.org/images/stories/issuu_icon.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Flash at ISSUU

The image “http://www.i-mag.org/images/stories/scibd_icon.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Flash at Scribd

 The image “http://www.i-mag.org/images/stories/text_con.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Text (HTML)

Read by Section

Artistic Sections:

 

Intellectual Sections:

 

I-MAG Extra

Authors

No authors available